Non-motoring > Hip replacement anyone ? Miscellaneous
Thread Author: legacylad Replies: 55

 Hip replacement anyone ? - legacylad
After almost a decade of slowly increasing pain in one hip, and taking increasingly strong painkillers to keep walking, the surgeon told me today that I need to bite the bullet and get a new one.
I’m terrified of hospitals so have deferred as long as reasonable...I’m fine hanging off a cliff face or striding across a knife sharp arête in the Alps ( until 2 years ago) but hospitals bring me out in a cold sweat.
A 12 month wait or 6 weeks if I pay privately. Nothing new there.
He assured me that a new hip would last me my lifetime ( does he know something I don’t)... I’m reasonably fit, but piling on a few pounds since I can no longer stride out on long distances, and my first love of backpacking is currently a no go.
I’ve been banned from one of my more strenuous Spanish walking groups, and as Chair of an LDWA group I’ve been unable to go on their walks for the past 24+ months.

Hopefully from op back to full fitness will be 3-4 months....I’ll check out Pilates both both pre and post op, see if that helps the recovery process, and I may even be able to start (slow) jogging again, something I haven’t been able to do for several years.

Has anyone any experience of this op please.....?
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
I'll let you know, my friend went in Monday, came out this morning. Had it done privately.

Your NHS 12 months wait is, to be frank, a little optimistic.

Your recovery timescale depends on physio, if you have a private tame one, get in touch, if you dont, find one. Its not a matter of the hip, its a matter of correcting the issues of bad gait and posture you have built up guarding the duff hip, and the ones you introduce mentally guarding the new one.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - neiltoo
Mrs Too would agree with Zero's advice.

Classic perfect recovery from private operation.

Was climbing stairs 48 hours, home immediately after some physyiotherapy.

Started walking on crutches at home increasing to 1 mile a day (12 return trips along our flat avenue and several circuits of our living room when wet). I noted that she was pushing both crutches forward together and walking forward, which seemed unbalanced to me. Suggested she alternate the crutches and move the opposite leg, which improved her gait.

Visited a local physio who said she was doing everything right, and didn't need to see him again.

Took about 12 weeks.

Man up and get it done ASAP! and best wishes.

Good advice is to check up on your surgeon's track record. A good one will tell you.
Last edited by: neiltoo on Thu 21 Jul 22 at 15:29
 Hip replacement anyone ? - legacylad
Thanks Z....I’ve had increasing back and knee pain the past 15/18 months as a direct result of the hip.
And I’m not very dignified getting over awkward stone stiles.
Fortunately there are none of those in Spain....

I’m a big scaredy cat around hospitals....need to grow a pair and crack on with it.
Last edited by: legacylad on Thu 21 Jul 22 at 15:29
 Hip replacement anyone ? - sherlock47
I must know about 10 people who have had hip replacements. 1 privately. Not statistically significant in view of the small number, however the only one that was problematic was the (self funded) private operation. A bone infection was ultimately diagnosed, the private hospital could not do anything and denied all responsibility, he was referred back to the NHS and underwent removal of the joint, a period without a joint, a temporary joint (with antibiotic properties?) a period of excessive pain and disability and a long term heavy limp.

My father had a NHS hip done under local anaesthetic (he was over 90 at the time) and was conscious the whole time. Now that would bring me out in a cold sweat! Took away all the pain and was walking within 10days after good physio.

Come to your own conclusions.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero

>> My father had a NHS hip done under local anaesthetic (he was over 90 at
>> the time) and was conscious the whole time.

Yeah, thats the norm, they use a spinal.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Runfer D'Hills
I don’t know anyone who has had it done. But then I suppose I’m quite a bit younger than most here…
;-)
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
Despite your numerous efforts to get there via the injurious short cut.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - legacylad
Same surgeon for me whether through the NHS or privately. I’ve heard good reports about him from neighbours....he told me that Airedale NHS Trust don’t currently allow private ops at AGH, but he’d operate on me at the Yorkshire Clinic instead.

Rightly or wrongly, I’ve always thought that in the event of the sheet hitting the fan during an op at a private hospital, you’d need to get to an A & E NHS ASAP.
He confirmed that, and I’d like as many odds stacked in my favour as possible.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero

>> Rightly or wrongly, I’ve always thought that in the event of the sheet hitting the
>> fan during an op at a private hospital, you’d need to get to an A
>> & E NHS ASAP.

Yeah but what they are very bad at is a "crash" your chances surviving that at a private hospital is poor.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - sherlock47
I have been told of a private hospital in Ipswich which has a sign up in the operating theatre, 'In the event of cardiac arrest, dial 999.'

Not much good with average response times continuing o increase. Although a DNR declaration may save you on post-operative care fees.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
I guess you have to weigh up the very long wait for an NHS op against the theoretical benefit of the full equipped A and E being at hand. It’s a pretty safe operation these days though with mortality rates around 0.3%
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Stuartli
A friend's 90-year-old relative had a fall a few days ago and needed a hip replacement.

She was taken to the local NHS general hospital and had the operation a day or two later, which proved successful, although she had to go into intensive care for a day or so.

On a normal ward now and waiting to go into a convalescence home for a rest period. It's her second hip replacement operation over the years, but it's not surprising that both have proved very successful as it's one of the most common operations carried out.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Stuartli
>> It’s a pretty safe operation these days though with mortality rates around 0.3%>>

My late mother had a hip replacement operation in the early 1960s - we reckoned it added at least 20 years to her life.

The nurses actually started her daily briefly walking routine (with support) the day after the operation!
 Hip replacement anyone ? - legacylad
0.3% mortality sounds like a lot to me.
So 1 in 300 who go for a hip replacement come out in a wooden overcoat ?

That’s just put me right off. Especially in a private hospital, albeit with the surgeon who would have done it on the NHS.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - tyrednemotional
..SWMBO is 4.5 weeks into recovery.

NHS, 5 months waiting. Operated 14:30 Monday, out 13:30 Tuesday, and climbed stairs that evening.

As posted elsewhere, we had a bit of a hiccough when she passed out the next morning, but she has been walking 1.5 miles with crutches for a week or so now, migrated to walking poles yesterday (same distance) and is mobile around the house without.

She was apprehensive about it, particularly having it done under local anaesthetic. She can't really remember very much about it at all, given the sedation. If you need it, just get it done - it is likely to make a big difference.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Manatee
>> 0.3% mortality sounds like a lot to me.
>> So 1 in 300 who go for a hip replacement come out in a wooden
>> overcoat ?
>>
>> That’s just put me right off. Especially in a private hospital, albeit with the surgeon
>> who would have done it on the NHS.

Sounds pretty good to me. I thought it would be worse. The average will include lots of really quite elderly and relatively frail people with all sorts of co-morbidities.

If it were possible to get odds for a male otherwise in yomping condition? like yourself I think they would be quite a bit better.

Consider also - for all males between 65-74, the annual death risk from all causes is nearer 1 in 50. And probably worse for the ones who don't/can't exercise.

A successful hip-op might actually extend your life, not shorten it.

I also recall being told that the fatality risk for an angiogram was actually about 1 in 400. I applied similar reasoning - the average patient having an angiogram is probably not in a great place to start with (I survived BTW).

Hope that helps:)

Last edited by: Manatee on Thu 21 Jul 22 at 17:50
 Hip replacement anyone ? - John Boy
Re: Private v NHS - private definitely quicker, but not necessarily better. One of my daughters damaged a knee ligament playing football. The private operation was a failure which had to be sorted by the NHS.

Re: The fear - my partner's brother had a fear of needles and scalpels due to a really bad experience in his adolescence. He put off operations on Dupuytrens Contracture in his hands until most of his fingers were permanently curled up. He took the plunge last year and had one hand done (local anaesthetic). Now he can't wait to get the other (much worse one) done.

 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
Of course you might find yourself outsourced to a private hospital by the NHS.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - bathtub tom
I keep hearing problems of elderly folk having general anaesthetic bringing on dementia. I've experience in one case where it may be true. I wonder if that's why so many procedures are carried out under a local?

Like LL, any procedure scares me to death. I've to go to my dentist later this month and sweating already!
 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
General anaesthesia is generally more risky than local, more so as you get older I guess.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - James Loveless
"... any procedure scares me to death. I've to go to my dentist later this month and sweating already!"

I know the feeling very well. For years I had serious issues about going to the dentist and as for going for a blood test...

In the last few years I've spent more time at a hospital (in-patient, out-patient; surgery, scans and tests, various endoscopies) than in the whole of my life before. All I can say is that the "procedures" get easier with time - for me at least. Which is not to say I don't get very nervous, but somehow it doesn't weigh on me so much and I don't worry so far in advance.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
>> All I
>> can say is that the "procedures" get easier with time - for me at least.
>> Which is not to say I don't get very nervous, but somehow it doesn't weigh
>> on me so much and I don't worry so far in advance.

I am spectacularly laissez-faire about going into hospital for tests, procedures or surgery of any kind or severity. Bothers me not one jot.

Bothers the hell out of me that I have to share a ward with lunatics or other deeply irritating patients (I have had my share of them believe me) afterwards, but most of all I am deeply deeply bothered that it all might have been a waste of time and didnt resolve the issue,
Last edited by: Zero on Thu 21 Jul 22 at 23:16
 Hip replacement anyone ? - henry k
>> I keep hearing problems of elderly folk having general anaesthetic bringing on dementia.
>> I've experience in one case where it may be true.
>> I wonder if that's why so many procedures are carried out under a local?
>>
From my observations of SWMBO every op made her dementia significantly worse.
Certainly at one of the earlier ops it was dismissed but IMO that was rubbish.
She had 2 x knee replacements and later a heart valve +
Recognition of the situation has improved but would avoid a general knock out if possible.

www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/risk-factors-and-prevention/general-anaesthetics

 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
>> >> I keep hearing problems of elderly folk having general anaesthetic bringing on dementia.
>> >> I've experience in one case where it may be true.
>> >> I wonder if that's why so many procedures are carried out under a local?

Its not just the GA that hastens it, Its being removed from home for a while, the change of routine, faces change, fear, worry, temporary disability they all contribute.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - tyrednemotional
>> I wonder if that's why so many procedures are carried out under a local?
>>


..it's so you're awake enough to tell them they've started on the wrong hip....
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
>> Of course you might find yourself outsourced to a private hospital by the NHS.

Yeah I was outsourced to the private hospital during my last op - mainly because of covid. The good thing about this private hospital is that it has a connecting underground tunnel to the emergency room in the NHS Hospital.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Duncan
St Peter's?
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
>> St Peter's?

Yeah its linked to the Runnymede.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - John Boy
I've just been reading the lengthy PDF given to me after my recent hip operation. It's obviously about fractures, but this section seems relevant to LL:

"You can gradually resume more normal physical activities at three months, for example: swimming, cycling, bowls, gardening and dancing. Jogging has high impact and may cause a hemi-arthroplasty or total hip replacement to fail earlier, so we advise against regularly running a large number of miles. Being active is good for building your bone and muscle strength to reduce future problems with osteoporosis."
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Falkirk Bairn
SWMBO had a hip done on NHS about 5 years.
In/out in 2 days - operation noon on Monday discharges noon Wednesday - in saying noon Wed we had to wait another 2+ hours for the medication - staff shortages in the pharmacy.

Success as the acute pain is gone but she has side effects of the surgery - damaged nerves and "tingling" sensations. Otherwise 100%.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Terry
A few thoughts:

1. Wife many years ago used to work in private hospital was very clear - anything complicated go to the NHS. Carpets and fine food don't make up for a lack of emergency capability.

Hip operations are relatively low risk and routine. Question is how quickly do you want it done, and is it affordable..

2. The mortality risk is somewhat skewed. Those needing hip operations are typically older and likely to have other health issues

If otherwise in good health and moderately fit I suspect risks are much lower than average - although there are no guarantees.

Note the risk (obesity, heart, etc) associated with stopping exercise due to hip problems may anyway exceed the operation risk.

3. Many things in life make folk worry irrationally. Hospitals, of which I sadly have too much experience, do not worry me. Precipitate roads and paths with no safety barriers do.

The objective behaviour is to accept that if risks are low and easily managed by many, your reaction is anomalous - i short, get on with it.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Runfer D'Hills
Does it occur to anyone else that there might be a commentary about the forum demographics buried in the fact that today’s most popular topic is hip replacements?
;-)
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Fullchat
We could move on to cataracts :)

 Hip replacement anyone ? - Dog
Or incontinence pads.

(*_*)
 Hip replacement anyone ? - tyrednemotional
...or arm transplants...
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Ambo
To return to the OP, some advice from a therapist:

When feeling apprehensive,remember that bravery only works in particular areas of behaviour, does not apply to all .
Do not delay starting down this necessary path.Needless delay only increases apprehension.
Prepare yourself. Learn about proper deep breathing,using the whole body. [Someone who does Yoga will be able to show you] Do a slow session daily. At the same time concentrate only on the present minute ,a form of mindfulness.You will build up the ability to switch off,calm the body and mind together.
Now is the time to start,so that by the time you have surgery you will be able to use this technique very easily
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Bromptonaut
I broke the neck of my femur when my Brompton did a flick roll underneath me around ten years ago. It was explained that while they might screw it a complete replacement was the alternative if that did not work.

In the event canulated screws did the job so I ended up with a surgical wound similar to a replacement but kept my own joint.

Was up next day and started physio within 48 hours, firstly the basics of using crutches to maove around then moving from standing to sitting and vv. Finally we tackled stairs. I was out witihn a week followed by 6 weeks in crutches. Think I was formally on sick leave but work supplied me with a laptop etc so I could keep myself in the loop.

In hospital I was, at 52, apart from somebody who'd come off a motorbike the youngest by 30 years. Others were all old men, at least one old enough to have served in WW2, who had fallen in or about their homes. Two were clearly demented.

My mother had both hips replaced after falls. The first in her mid eighties from which she recovered but never walked again without a frame at home and out of doors. She could manage with a stick but lack of confidence and a suspicion the tumble at home, she was on the floor all night, was down to cerebral insufficiency.

Lived long enough after to celebrate her 90th. Another tumble at home at 91 affected the other leg. By this time her ongoing congestive heart failure was too much and she died without being discharged.

Both were done under spinal block as she was way to high a risk for a GA.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
“ Prepare yourself. Learn about proper deep breathing,using the whole body. [Someone who does Yoga will be able to show you] Do a slow session daily. At the same time concentrate only on the present minute ,a form of mindfulness.You will build up the ability to switch off,calm the body and mind together.”

Alternatively “Don’t be a wimp, just get on with it”. ;-)
 Hip replacement anyone ? - John Boy
>> Alternatively “Don’t be a wimp, just get on with it”. ;-)
>>
Even if you're joking, CGN, that's not helpful. At least Ambo's trying, even if his suggestion isn't scientific enough for you.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
>> >> Alternatively “Don’t be a wimp, just get on with it”. ;-)
>> >>
>> Even if you're joking, CGN, that's not helpful. At least Ambo's trying, even if his
>> suggestion isn't scientific enough for you.

He had a point tho, recovery from hip breaks/replacements is usually a matter of attitude, its very easy to fall into the role of disabled.

Whether you use Yoga, yoghurt or sheer b mindedness, the physio only has a brief time to cajole you, the rest of it is up to you.

And get to know your core and your pelvic floor.
Last edited by: Zero on Fri 22 Jul 22 at 14:28
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Zero
>> Does it occur to anyone else that there might be a commentary about the forum
>> demographics buried in the fact that today’s most popular topic is hip replacements?
>> ;-)

you'll be pleased to know mine was because of a Motorbike accident in my youth. Falling off two wheeled things carries a bill to be paid
 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
>> Does it occur to anyone else that there might be a commentary about the forum
>> demographics buried in the fact that today’s most popular topic is hip replacements?
>> ;-)
>>

Keep getting adds for Hip replacement surgery in India.

Makes a change from adds for pre paid funeral plans
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Duncan

>> Keep getting adds for Hip replacement surgery in India.
>>
>> Makes a change from adds for pre paid funeral plans

Use adblocker.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
>>
>> >> Keep getting adds for Hip replacement surgery in India.
>> >>
>> >> Makes a change from adds for pre paid funeral plans
>>
>> Use adblocker.
>>

Might miss out on a bargain cremation though.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - tyrednemotional
>>
>> Might miss out on a bargain cremation though.
>>

...that would be after the (attempted) hip replacement in India...?

(Ganges, anyone?)
 Hip replacement anyone ? - MD
With regard to the anaesthetic etc. I'm now 4 weeks post knee replacement. I don't know whether this applies to Hips as well, but I had a Spinal block which I think is a modern epidural although I'm happy to be corrected. I didn't have anything else and stayed wide awake throughout the whole procedure.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Rudedog
Spinals have their place, especially during Covid, they are limited in that they are a 'one shot' block so if the procedure takes longer than expected they start to wear off and can't be topped up so are often converted to a GA.

Most elective hips are safe although we are doing a lot of revisions when they become lose or infected, one of the issues with any kind of joint replacement is the use of the cement, it's vile and because of the chemicals used which can be carcinogenic before it goes hard, the most dangerous part of the replacement is when the cement goes in as it can cause massive drops in blood pressure, combine this with a spinal which also can have the side effect of dropping your BP and often a GA is safer even for the older patient.

I've had numerous GAs over the years, some for major ops and you can't beat a good dose of morphine!
 Hip replacement anyone ? - BiggerBadderDave
"successful hip-op might actually extend your life"

Yes, it was the mid 80s when Run-DMC introduced it into my vernacular and I'm still alive.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - legacylad
Just out of curiosity, can you opt to go outside of your Health Authority if you can somehow find out the waiting list is shorter ?

I suppose all waiting lists are fluid....I was told 12 months and counting in my area. Suppose I’m used to the nagging pain now so it’s forsnt prevent me walking reasonable distances, with painkillers and gritted teeth. Unfortunately I can’t walk those distances consecutive days.

Pilates appears to be recommended both pre and post op. Never tried it. Maybe I should.
Just not after an afternoon session in the pub.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - Duncan
Yes.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - CGNorwich
www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/about-the-nhs/your-choices-in-the-nhs/
 Hip replacement anyone ? - legacylad
I’m still getting out and about walking two days a week....painkillers with my breakfast, some more with my sandwiches, but nothing too strong in large quantities.

Lots of enquiries with contacts in the medical field lead me to believe that waiting lists on the NHS show no signs of reducing in the foreseeable, and as most of my social life revolves around walking and outdoor activities there’s no point in saving my money for a rainy day. Spend it and hopefully get back to doing the stuff I love. And appreciate again the company of good friends who do similar.

I’ve arranged another consultation (£250) out of area at a hospital which specialises in orthopaedics, and I thought that if I’m going to pay I may as well choose where my moola goes. My GP is doing me a referral letter which I’ll take to the consultation, so with luck and surgery I hope to be back in the mountains next Spring...assuming an op in November immediately after I return from an arranged trip to Spain.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - MD
A couple of guys I know were referred to the private sector by the NHS and the NHS paid.
 Hip replacement anyone ? - neiltoo
Good.

On recovery, exercise as much as you can. In order to reach the joint, they have to disturb the long muscles in the leg (quadriceps?), and you have to build up their strength again. Walking does it, fortunately, but don't be tempted to lose the crutches too soon.

Save a little money for physio advice, it's worth it.

All the best

8o)
 Hip replacement anyone ? - tyrednemotional
...JFDI..

In your circumstances, the risk/reward ratio seems to amply favour it.

SWMBO is now 6.5 weeks post-op. She was "signed-off" yesterday (albeit technically she isn't finally discharged until a further review, 1 year post-op).

We're up to 3+ miles walks on footpaths (not road/pavement) with poles (which she was using before anyway) twice a day and whilst there is still some way to go to ultimate articulation and mobility the hip pain is now non-existent, and most of any remaining discomfort is from rebuilding muscle tone.

She hasn't driven yet, but the consultant is comfortable with her doing so as soon as she is OK with an emergency stop. Insurance company are happy to take the medical advice.

We were lucky in that the (NHS) wait from first consultation to op was 5 months (the prospect of anything as low as three months was dangled). As, like you, our main enjoyment comes from such as walking/cycling, if it had been substantially longer, it would have been done privately.

I think there will be an amount of restricted articulation from here on (shoe/boot laces on one side are currently an issue, that hopefully will resolve) but the improvement in mobility, and lack of pain is very noticeable, even to me ;-). Virtually all intervention from me is now not required.
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